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Install BackTrack 5 R2 OS in VMware


  • Run the VMware Player (version 3.14 or higher) virtual machine executable (.exe) file.
  •  The VMware Player Window appears on the screen, having the list of installed OSes on the left screen and the menu with a list of options on the right.
  •  Click on Create a New Virtual Machine option on the right-side menu of the VMware player window and a New Virtual Machine Wizard Menu Window appears on the screen.
  • Select Installer disc image file (iso) option and Click Browse… for locating the path of the downloaded BackTrack 5 ISO file. However, a caution message is also displayed. But, Click Next to move further.
  • Select Linux option from the list of Guest Operating System Menu and Other Linux 2.6x Kernel option from the Version Menu of Select the Guest Operating System Window.
  • Type the name “BackTrack 5” (or whatever suits) on the Virtual Machine Name Menu. The Location can be changed by Browse… option as per private settings. Click Next after satisfactory changes.
  • A Ready to Create Virtual Machine Menu Window appears to present the details of the entire required configuration setting for installing BackTrack 5.
  • Some settings could be changed by clicking Customize Hardware… option, where a separate Hardware Window is opened allowing changing the allocated Memory, Processors size, adding or removing hardware devices. Make sure to add (or don’t remove) Modem or any Network Adapter device into this virtual machine because an Internet Connection would be required for upcoming experiments. Click OK after changing satisfactory settings.
  •  Changes could be seen after customizing the Hardware settings. Select/Tick the Power on this Virtual Machine after creation option on the bottom menu. Click Finish to begin the installation of BackTrack 5.
  • VMware Player would start installing BackTrack 5 OS into Virtual Machine.
  • Click on the I Finished Installing option at the bottom message menu and Click into the black screen.
  • Press Enter key and BackTrack 5 Live CD Menu appears on the Virtual Machine Window.
  • Select BackTrack Text – Default Boot Text mode option from the Menu by pressing Enter key. The BackTrack would start installing sooner.
  • After installing on Live CD within seconds, another BackTrack 5 screen appears mentioning the default root username (root) and default root password (toor). Type “startx” on root@root: command workspace for starting its graphical interface, GNOME.
  • The BackTrack 5 Live CD has been installed and the main screen appears on the Virtual Machine.
  • Double-Click on the upper tab of VMware window to full screen view of the BackTrack 5 OS.

 

  • Press Ctrl+Alt keys for returning back to Windows system.
  • As per default settings of Virtual Machine, the BackTrack 5 has a default screen resolution of 800×600. To change the desired settings, Go to System > Preferences > Monitors Menu.
  • The Monitor Preferences Window appears, including all the required monitor settings.
  • Click on the Resolution drop down menu and select the desired resolution (e.g. 1024×768). Click Apply after satisfactory settings.
  • A message box has been displayed for at most 15 seconds. Click on Keep this Configuration option.
  •  A New screen resolution could be observed on the Virtual Machine.

 

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Install Ubuntu on Windows using VMware Player


Would you like to use Ubuntu Linux programs, but prefer the convenience of Windows 7?  With VMware Player, you can install a full copy of Ubuntu and integrate it with your Windows 7 computer for free.

VMware Player makes it easy to install Ubuntu Linux as a virtual machine in only 5 clicks.  It then offers easy access to Ubuntu programs straight from your desktop with Unity mode.  Here’s how you can set this up on your computer.

Getting Started

First, download and install VMware Player (link below).  It is a free download, but requires registration. I’ve used VMware Workstation 6.5. You can use the latest versions of VMware Player or Workstation available as well.

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You may see some prompts about installing drivers; simply approve them.  We didn’t see them on our latest test, but have in the past.  When you are finished installing VMware Player, you will have to restart your computer.

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Install Ubuntu

Once you have installed VMware Player and downloaded Ubuntu, you’re ready to setup Ubuntu.  Open VMware Player, and choose “Create a New Virtual Machine.”

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You can install Ubuntu from a disk, or directly from the ISO file you can download (link below).  This is the simplest method if you’re simply wanting to use Ubuntu in VMware Player.  However, if you do have an Ubuntu disk, then feel free to choose that instead.  Once you’ve selected your install media, VMware Player will automatically detect Ubuntu and will show that it will be installed with Easy Install.  Click next to continue.

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Now enter your name, user name, and password.  All fields are required.

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Please note that the username can only have lowercase characters and numbers.

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Also, the password must be at least 8 characters long.

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Now, choose a name for your virtual machine and where to save it.  Simply click next to accept the defaults.

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You can choose how large you want your virtual hard drive to be; the default is 20Gb, but you can choose a different size if you wish.  Please note that the entire 20Gb will not be used up on your hard drive initially.  Ours only took up 3.6Gb with a clean install, but this will increase as you install programs and save files.

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And that’s it!  You can review your settings and change them here if you wish, or simply click Finish to start installing Ubuntu!

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VMware player will now install Ubuntu without any further input.  The window may show cryptic commands, but don’t worry, as you don’t have to do anything else to install Ubuntu.

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During the install, you may be prompted to download and install VMware tools for Linux.  Simply click Download and the tools will automatically download and install, though you may have to approve the UAC prompt.

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VMware will continue installing Ubuntu even while the tools are downloading.  Once the install is finished, you will be presented with your Ubuntu login screen.  The full install took about 30 minutes in our test.

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Select your user name, then enter your password to access Ubuntu.

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Welcome to your Ubuntu desktop!

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Installing VMware Tools

VMware Player will attempt to automatically install the VMware tools into Ubuntu during the initial setup, but sometimes this does not work.  In our test, the tools failed to install during the Ubuntu setup since our internet connection was down.  In your tests, it may or may not automatically install.  If it doesn’t, follow the following steps to install them.  Please not that this is fairly complicated, so be sure to enter the correct things during the install.

To install the tools, click VM and then select “Install VMware Tools” in the menu.

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This will open a File Browser window.  Double click on the VMwareTools icon; this should look like a box that says tar.gz on the front.

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This will open the compressed file.  Click the Extract button at the top of the window.

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Now, choose where to save the files.  Simply click “Desktop” on the left, and then click Extract.

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This will take a moment.  When the files are extracted, click “Close”.

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Now, click the Applications menu at the top of the screen, click Accessories, and then click Terminal.

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Enter the following to access the files you unzipped before:

cd ./Desktop/vmware-tools-distrib

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Now, enter:

sudo bash

and enter your password when prompted.  Please note that the password will not show while you are typing it in; simply type it in, and press Enter when completed.

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Now we can install the VMware tools.  To do this, enter:

./vmware-install.pl

and then simply press enter at the prompts to accept the defaults.  It should ask a total of 5 questions, and just press enter at all of them. image

After a bit, it may ask the following questions about documentation files; simply press enter again at each prompt.

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The installation is now complete.  You will still need to configure the tools, so simply enter “yes” at the prompt to automatically do that.

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It may ask to enable an experimental backup feature; we simply entered “no” at this prompt.

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Then, it will want to setup the graphics configurations.  Enter “yes” at the prompt.  Your screen may flicker or go black momentarily while it is changing these settings.

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Finally, you will see the following message when the install is complete.

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Restart Ubuntu by clicking on the button with your username at the top right, and then selecting Restart from the menu.

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Once your virtual machine has rebooted, login to Ubuntu as before and your setup is complete!

Integrate Ubuntu with Windows 7

You can already use all of Ubuntu’s tools and features directly from the Ubuntu desktop in VMware Player.  But, if you would like to use your Ubuntu programs seamlessly in Windows, we need to activate Unity mode.  Click VM and then Unity Mode in the VMware Player Menu.

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Now, you will have an Ubuntu menu right above your Windows 7 Start button!

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By default, the Ubuntu windows will have a border and VMware logo on them.

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To change this, click VM and then Settings, select the Options tab, and uncheck the “Show borders” and “Show badges” boxes.

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Now the windows will look just like they do in Ubuntu.

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You can run Ubuntu windows side-by-side with Windows 7 windows, and can copy and paste, drag-and-drop between the windows, and more!  The Ubuntu programs’ icons show up in the taskbar the same as normal Windows programs.

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You can access all of the files in your Ubuntu virtual machine from the Ubuntu menu.  Select Other, and then choose Computer or Home Folder.

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Conclusion

VMware Player gives us an exciting way to have a complete Ubuntu install right inside Windows 7.  This would work the exact same on any modern version of Windows, including all editions of XP and Vista.  In this tutorial we used Ubuntu 9.10, but other recent editions should work the same.

Links

Download Ubuntu

Download VMware Player 3

VMware Supports

VMware Manual PDF

 


C/C++ Programming on Linux using GCC


Hey Guys !! I’m back again with some Technical Stuff once again.

Well Just few days back, I was in search for a place where i could get proper techniques of C/C++ Programming under Linux Platforms using GCC. Actually, I’ve mostly used Windows in my Life and as a matter of fact, I’ve used either Turbo C++ or Dev C++ under Windows Platforms. I even didn’t required anything else so far. But since my MAD Professor insisted us to practice C++ in Linux, my search for E-books, Documents and Softwares beings,  for understanding C/C++ in Linux using GCC/G++ compiler, begins.

It took me a while to figure out that Linux is in fact the best Operating System or OS, for typical Non-Gamers unlike me. 😛 And whenever I DO login Windows, even by mistake, I am greeted by a slew of viruses and a painfully slow speed. Anyways, I figured I should do even my C programming on Linux. It was there in my coursework from college you know!

There are two ways in which you can program in C in Linux:

1) Use an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) like Netbeans or Codeblocks.

OR

2) Use the inbuilt GCC compiler, like I did.

GCC basically stands for GNU C Compiler. Its not actually an IDE, but it kinda works when you get used to it. Plus, its easier to setup. Many people (including me) were in a total state of confusion at first, but hey, turns out its pretty simple!

Let me illustrate the steps you need to take to compile and build a program on a Linux machine.

1) Type out your code in a text file (on gedit) and give it a “.c” extension. It actually works. Atleast in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick, your pre-processor code will have a different colour than the rest, and so on, like a normal IDE.

2) Go to Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal. Use the command “cd” to navigate to the directory where your “.c” file is stored. Eg: If your file is stored in “Documents” under the root folder, the type “cd Documents” in the terminal.

3) If your filename is say, “code.c”, then type “gcc code.c -o code”. This compiles and builds your required file.

4) Type “./code” to run your program. And Its all done !!

And of course, if u need to use C++, just replace gcc” by “g++”. And save the file as “.cpp”. The rest is all basically the same. Even sometimes, It can happen that GCC may not be installed in your OS. Not a problem. It will automatically prompt you to install it in a couple of simple steps, which require you just pressing “y/n”.

At the end of the day, Linux programming may not give you a very distinct advantage, but hey, its different! Its a skill that you’ll need to learn eventually maybe and since I got to know how to get with it easily, so why not learn it now? 😉


Install and Run C++ In Windows 7


Well Guys, Since most of us are having Windows 7 Operating Systems in our PCs or Lappies.

I’ve noticed that there is problem in Installing some of the Old C++ compliers (especially Turbo C++). A lot of my friends are still having a difficulty in Installing and further Running the Application.

Regarding this issue,  I’ve searched through Internet and finally, discovered its Solution, which I’m gonna with y’all right now in the following Points Step-by-Step.

Installation of TurboC++ in Windows 7

1. Download Turbo C++ complier, which is easily available on various Software Sharing Websites.
Otherwise, Download from here
2. Extract the zip files to: e.g. C:\TurboC

step1 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Extract zip files

3. Run the installation file: C:\TurboC\INSTALL.EXE

step2 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Run the install

4. Press Enter to continue

step3 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Press Enter to continue

5. Enter the Source drive: e.g.C   and press Enter to continue

step4 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Enter the Source drive

6. Enter the Source path: \TURBOC    and press Enter to continue

step5 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Enter the Source path

7. In directories, Specify where Turbo C files are copied. E.g.  C:\TC . When done go to start instalation and press Enter

step6 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Specify where Turbo C++ files are copied

Hence, Your Installation is successful. 😀

step7 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Succesfull instalation

8. Launch from your destination      e.g.   C:\TC\BIN\TC.EXE

step8 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7Launch from your destination

Sometimes, It might not Run properly or even would be unable to Run. So therefore, After Downloading and Installing Turbo C++ complier in your System, We now require a DosBox Software, which is capable of running Turbo C++ Complier in Windows 7 64-Bit format very easily.

Installation of DosBox in Windows 7

1. Install the software DOSBox ver 0.73 :Download from here

2. Run the DOSBox 0.73 from the icon located on the desktop:
step 1 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
3. Type the following commands at the command prompt

[Z]: mount d c:\Turbo\ [The folder TC is present inside the folder Turbo]

Now you should get a message which says: Drive D is mounted as a local directory c:\Turbo\
step 2 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
4. Type d: to shift to d:
step 3 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
5. Next follow the commands below:

cd tc

cd bin

tc or tc.exe [This starts you the Turbo C++ 3.0]

step 4 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
6. In the Turbo C++ goto Options>Directories> Change the source of TC to the source directory [D] ( i.e. virtual D: refers to original c:\Turbo\ . So make the path change to something like D:\TC\include and D:\TC\lib respectively )

Starting TurboC++ in the DOSBox automatically:

You can save yourself some time by having DOSBox automatically mount your folders and start TurboC++:

For DOSBox versions older then 0.73 browse into program installation folder and open the dosbox.conf file in any text editor. For version 0.73 go to Start Menu and click on “Configuration” and then “Edit Configuration“. Then scroll down to the very end, and add the lines which you want to automatically execute when DOSBox starts.
Automatically mount and start Turbo C++3.0 in DOSBox ver 0.73:
step 5 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
Scroll down to the very end, and add the lines:
step 6 How to install Turbo C++ on Windows 7 64bit
Those commands will be executed automatically when DOSBox starts!
Please note: For Full screen: Alt and Enter

When you exit from the DosBox [precisely when u unmount the virtual drive where Turbo C++ 3.0 has been mounted] all the files you have saved or made changes in Turbo C++ 3.0 will be copied into the source directory(The directory which contains TC folder)

PS:- Don’t use shortcut keys to perform operations in TC because they might be a shortcut key for DOSBOX also . Eg : Ctrl+F9 will exit DOSBOX rather running the code .

Moreover, I’ve uploaded an VIDEO tutorial for your convenience. Take a look on it Fellows.